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Setting the Standard for Wastewater Treatment

LWF has been advocating for improvements to Winnipeg wastewater treatment and closely monitoring ongoing developments.

Excess phosphorus is the cause of potentially harmful algae blooms on Lake Winnipeg, which have been increasing in size and frequency in recent years.

Winnipeg’s North End Water Pollution Control Centre (NEWPCC) is the single largest point source of phosphorus to the lake. It releases an average of 600 kg of phosphorus every day. This is over three times the 1 mg/L phosphorus limit prescribed in the plant’s provincial operating licence, which was first issued under Manitoba’s...

Winnipeg's north end sewage treatment plant

Two significant decisions were made on Sept. 26 at City Hall related to Winnipeg sewage, the single largest point source of phosphorus contributing to the growth of algae blooms on Lake Winnipeg.

Immediate action on phosphorus reduction rejected

Council rejected a motion to direct Water and Waste staff to immediately test and implement interim phosphorus reduction at the North End Water Pollution Control Centre (NEWPCC).

This motion was brought forward by Coun. Klein, who requested a suspension of the rules to have the issue brought to council for debate. His motion was defeated by a vote of...

Collage of photos showing algae blooms on Lake Winnipeg

Algae blooms at Connaught Beach and Lester Beach, July 2019; Photos (clockwise from top left): Murray McCaig, Jennifer Engbrecht, Carter Brooks, Laurie Bennett

Update: The city’s request for an extension for NEWPCC upgrades is now under review by the provincial regulator.

Manitoba Sustainable Development’s Environmental Approvals Branch must assess the city’s submission and decide whether or not to grant its request for a two-year extension. (The city has asked for a new deadline of Dec. 31, 2021, to come up with a plan that would include a revised date for a full plant upgrade and potential...

Poster for May 9 Science First event

Join us on May 9 to explore the science and politics surrounding Winnipeg’s wastewater infrastructure issues!

Hosted by Science First, a non-profit organization promoting science and evidence-based policy, this evening event will feature presentations from LWF’s executive director Alexis Kanu and University of Manitoba Biosystems Engineering Professor Nazim Cicek, followed by an audience Q & A.

This is a great opportunity to learn more about our recommendation for an interim retrofit to Winnipeg’s largest sewage treatment plant to help protect Lake Winnipeg – and pick up a copy of our...

On World Water Day, the Lake Winnipeg Foundation and the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) are releasing a report recommending an interim retrofit to Winnipeg’s largest sewage treatment plant. This retrofit could be implemented quickly and at low cost to significantly reduce the facility’s phosphorus contribution to Lake Winnipeg.

Research at the IISD Experimental Lakes Area shows that phosphorus is the nutrient responsible for potentially toxic algae blooms in freshwater lakes. Winnipeg’s North End Water Pollution Control Centre (NEWPCC) is currently the single...

With just one week until Winnipeg’s election, new polling results show citizens want immediate action taken to improve city sewage treatment.

In a survey conducted by Probe Research*, nearly two-thirds of Manitoba adults (65%) agree that upgrading Winnipeg’s north end sewage treatment plant should be “a very urgent priority.”

The North End Water Pollution Control Centre (NEWPCC) treats approximately 70 per cent of the city’s wastewater. The NEWPCC is currently the fourth largest phosphorus polluter among all wastewater treatment facilities in Canada and the single-largest point source of...

Winnipeg’s aging wastewater infrastructure is putting Lake Winnipeg at risk – which means civic leaders have a responsibility to take action.

Excessive amounts of phosphorus flowing into Lake Winnipeg from a variety of sources are causing potentially toxic algae blooms. Undertreated city sewage is one of these sources. Toilet water ultimately becomes lake water – all that stands between the two is our wastewater treatment system.

Winnipeg’s North End Water Pollution Control Centre (NEWPCC) treats approximately 70 per cent of the city’s wastewater. The NEWPCC is currently the fourth largest...

With Winnipeg’s municipal election slated for October 2018, LWF’s advocacy is focused this year on municipal wastewater treatment. City of Winnipeg sewage treatment plants represent the single largest point source contributor of phosphorus to Lake Winnipeg. To ensure we’re doing our part for Lake Winnipeg, phosphorus reduction through upgrades to these facilities must be a civic priority.

Setting the Standard for Wastewater Treatment is Action 3 of the Lake Winnipeg Health Plan.

Our educational report on Winnipeg’s wastewater woes ("Sewage S.O.S.") was distributed through the Winnipeg Free...

We’re pleased to report some encouraging news for the health of Lake Winnipeg from Sept. 30’s mayoral forum on environmental issues.

One of the three pre-determined questions posed to the six mayoral candidates in attendance (Gord Steeves was absent) concerned wastewater treatment.

Excess amounts of phosphorus are causing harmful algae blooms on Lake Winnipeg. City of Winnipeg wastewater treatment plants represent the single largest point source contributor of phosphorus to Lake Winnipeg. Winnipeg's North End Water Pollution Control Centre treats more than two-thirds of the city’s wastewater...

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