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Resources

Our education program assists educators to engage students on water stewardship issues and inspire youth action. As part of this program, we offer free school presentations about Lake Winnipeg.

With classes now underway across Manitoba, the COVID-19 pandemic has prompted new protocols and routines designed to keep students and staff safe. LWF has adapted our activities, too. We have suspended in-person presentations until further notice. Instead, we are now offering online presentations!

Our presentations can be tailored to different age groups and contain subject matter which is relevant to...

A photo of the North End Water Pollution Control Centre sign

On May 7, Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister announced a plan to increase provincial infrastructure investment by $500 million through the Manitoba Restart Program. The goal is to stimulate the economy as Manitoba deals with the effects of the pandemic.

Specific projects will be identified in the coming weeks. However, water and sewage projects and municipal infrastructure priorities were among those mentioned in a list of targeted fields.

LWF is urging the provincial government to prioritize much-needed upgrades to Winnipeg’s North End Water Pollution Control Centre (NEWPCC). You can read our...

A map of the Lake Winnipeg watershed

Many of us are spending a lot more time at home these days. Our Let's Learn series offers family-friendly educational activities and resources to help exercise your brain while keeping the kids entertained. Each post has a different theme related to Lake Winnipeg and offers different types of resources including colouring sheets, activity pages, videos, interactive online activites and experiments. Let's Learn about the Lake Winnipeg watershed!

These activities are best suited to the late elementary school to the early middle school levels. 

What is a watershed? It's an area that drains into a...

A researcher aboard the Bradbury (now in the Selkirk Marine Museum) collects surface sediment samples from Lake Winnipeg using an instrument called a dredge, circa 1969.

Despite its ecological, cultural and economic importance, Lake Winnipeg is relatively under-studied compared to other bodies of water. Today’s scientists are working to change that.

Research on and around the lake is ongoing, and each new finding furthers our understanding of its unique physical, biological and chemical characteristics. Scientific research also helps us understand how nutrients such as phosphorus are affecting...

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