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Today, the North End Water Pollution Control Centre (NEWPCC) Project Steering Committee, comprised of representatives from both the city and the province tasked with implementing an interim phosphorus reduction plan to improve the health of Lake Winnipeg, released an updated plan.

LWF, along with our partners at the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) and the Lake Winnipeg Indigenous Collective (LWIC), released a joint statement in response.

In 2019, both governments committed to accelerate phosphorus reduction at the NEWPCC. We’re concerned that the...

A photo of the North End Water Pollution Control Centre sign

A plan outlining next steps for both interim phosphorus reduction and full upgrades at Winnipeg’s North End sewage treatment plant was released today.

The plan was developed by a project steering committee for the North End Water Pollution Control Centre (NEWPCC), which includes representatives from both the city and the province.

The NEWPCC is the largest of Winnipeg’s three wastewater treatment facilities and the single largest point source of phosphorus to Lake Winnipeg. Excess amounts of phosphorus in freshwater ecosystems drive the growth of potentially toxic algae. Currently, the NEWPCC...

Winnipeg's north end sewage treatment plant

Thank you to everyone who has advocated for protecting Lake Winnipeg through improved wastewater treatment. We have an exiting update to share.

On Dec. 5, the Manitoba government denied the City of Winnipeg’s request for a two-year extension to develop a plan for phosphorus reduction at the North End Water Pollution Control Centre (NEWPCC).

Instead, the province is requiring that an interim phosphorus reduction plan be in place by Jan. 31, 2020.

The province will also assist the city move forward on plans to fully upgrade the NEWPCC so that it meets all requirements of its operating licence...

Wetlands

On Feb. 2, 1971, an intergovernmental treaty called the Ramsar Convention was adopted. Named for the Iranian city in which its adoption occurred, the convention came into force in 1975 to provide a framework for the conservation and wise use of wetlands and their resources. (You can learn more about the Ramsar Convention here.)

Today, almost 90 per cent of UN member states – including Canada – are considered “contracting parties.” Contracting parties implement the Ramsar Convention and collaborate on shared projects. More than 2,000 wetlands across the globe (37 in Canada) are currently...

Cattails

A new publication is celebrating the multitude of benefits offered by Manitoba’s wetlands!

Nature’s Wealth is a joint release from LWF, Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) and the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD).

The four-page feature delves into the ecological and economic value of wetland areas – everything from water purification, flood protection, wildlife habitat, biofuels, recreational opportunities and even food!

It also highlights some of the conservation, policy and research initiatives currently underway across the province; readers get to meet research...

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