Facebook icon.Twitter icon.Yotube icon.Instagram icon.

advocacy

Photo of the North End Water Pollution Control Centre sign, with address of 2230 Main Street below

Measurable phosphorus reduction at Winnipeg’s largest sewage treatment plant is one step closer to reality – a success made possible by committed citizens speaking up for change. 

On Feb. 9, Winnipeg’s Standing Policy Committee on Water and Waste, Riverbank Management and the Environment recommended funding for interim chemical phosphorus removal at the North End Water Pollution Control Centre (NEWPCC). 

The committee decision comes as a follow-up to an October 2019 Winnipeg City Council motion which directed department staff to test interim phosphorus removal options, report back to the...

A group photo of all the people and children who participated in the Victoria Beach Walk for Water event in 2017, with the children holding a banner that says we love Lake Winnipeg.

As individuals and as a group, citizens have great power to influence change. Decision-makers take note when people speak up for water; individually and collectively, our voices matter. Using our voices is an effective tool to influence policy, encourage action and hold governments accountable.

Now is an important time for freshwater advocacy. LWF has been engaging with all levels of crown government to push for evidence-based solutions to reduce phosphorus loading across the watershed.

Here’s a snapshot of what we’ve been up to – and how you can help us speak up for Lake Winnipeg.

At the...

Canada is a country defined by water – and improving the health of Lake Winnipeg is a well-established national priority, acknowledged through the policy priorities, mandate letters and throne speeches of successive federal governments.

But how do we move beyond good intentions and begin achieving meaningful results?

Together, the Lake Winnipeg Foundation and the Lake Winnipeg Indigenous Collective have released a position paper which identifies five things the federal government must do for Lake Winnipeg right now.

They are:

1. Recognize phosphorus as the cause of blue-green algal blooms on...

We need your help.

Today, the North End Water Pollution Control Centre (NEWPCC) Project Steering Committee, comprised of representatives from both the city and the province tasked with implementing an interim phosphorus reduction plan to improve the health of Lake Winnipeg, released an updated plan.

LWF, along with our partners at the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) and the Lake Winnipeg Indigenous Collective (LWIC), released a joint statement in response.

In 2019, both governments committed to accelerate phosphorus reduction at the NEWPCC. We’re concerned that the...

On Sept. 16, the International Joint Commission (IJC) announced it had submitted its recommendations on proposed Red River nutrient targets to the governments of Canada and the United States.

Recommended targets for the Red River at the boundary between the two countries include concentration objectives for phosphorus and nitrogen (0.15 and 1.15 milligrams per litre, respectively), as well as recommended annual loads for both nutrients: 1,400 tons for phosphorus and 9,525 tons for nitrogen.

The IJC’s decision to recommend nitrogen reduction as a strategy to reduce the frequency and severity of...

In 2018, the Manitoba Climate and Green Plan Act established an Expert Advisory Council to provide advice and recommendations to the Minister of Conservation and Climate. In August, this council solicited stakeholder input on a provincial water management strategy for Manitoba.

Our submission advocates for a science-based, outcome-focused strategy to effectively translate policy into meaningful practice to safeguard our shared waters. Such a strategy must be supported by robust evidence, include measurable targets and defined timelines for action, and strengthen monitoring and reporting...

Waves rolling onto a sandy shore.

Update: The deadline for public feedback on the IJC’s proposed nutrient loading targets and concentration objectives has been extended until March 28, 2020.

The International Joint Commission (IJC) works to prevent and resolve transboundary water disputes, investigating issues and recommending solutions to the governments of Canada and the United States. Guided by the Boundary Waters Treaty, which was signed in 1909, it was established in recognition that each country is affected by the other’s actions in lake and river systems along the border.

The IJC is currently soliciting public feedback...

A photo of the North End Water Pollution Control Centre sign

A plan outlining next steps for both interim phosphorus reduction and full upgrades at Winnipeg’s North End sewage treatment plant was released today.

The plan was developed by a project steering committee for the North End Water Pollution Control Centre (NEWPCC), which includes representatives from both the city and the province.

The NEWPCC is the largest of Winnipeg’s three wastewater treatment facilities and the single largest point source of phosphorus to Lake Winnipeg. Excess amounts of phosphorus in freshwater ecosystems drive the growth of potentially toxic algae. Currently, the NEWPCC...

In December, shortly after shuffling his cabinet, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau issued mandate letters to all federal ministers. Continuing a practice started by Trudeau in 2015, these letters have been released publicly and are available on the Office of the Prime Minister’s website.

Mandate letters outline the Prime Minister's expectations for each minister, including specific policy objectives which each minister is expected to accomplish.

The health of Lake Winnipeg is both a national priority and a cross-cutting file. Achieving meaningful positive change will require attention and...

Winnipeg's north end sewage treatment plant

Thank you to everyone who has advocated for protecting Lake Winnipeg through improved wastewater treatment. We have an exiting update to share.

On Dec. 5, the Manitoba government denied the City of Winnipeg’s request for a two-year extension to develop a plan for phosphorus reduction at the North End Water Pollution Control Centre (NEWPCC).

Instead, the province is requiring that an interim phosphorus reduction plan be in place by Jan. 31, 2020.

The province will also assist the city move forward on plans to fully upgrade the NEWPCC so that it meets all requirements of its operating licence...

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - advocacy
Join
Become a member and strengthen our collective efforts.